January 31, 2005

PBS and Black History Month..

PBS never lets us down when it comes to Black History month. They continue to demonstrte more than any other network an effort to put forth our story or atleast try. They are not going to let us down this year either, so get your vcr's, and dvr's ready.

PBS will be running a four Part series entitled "Slavery and the Making of America"

"SLAVERY AND THE MAKING OF AMERICA delves beyond the concept of slavery as a whole to focus on the remarkable stories of individual slaves, demonstrating that these Africans and African Americans were not passive victims but survivors who refused to concede their culture, character or spirit to the system that persecuted them. Over the last decade, leading scholars have unearthed a wealth of information that affirms and substantiates slavery's integral role in the development and growth of the United States."

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/

On their Emmy Winning Show, American Experience they will commemorate the 40th Anniversary of Malcolm X death with a special entitled "Malcolm X - Make it Plain" due to air on Feb 21, 2005.

"This film chronicles Malcolm X's remarkable journey from his birth on May 19, 1925 in Omaha, Nebraska, to his assassination at the Audubon Ballroom in New York City on February 21, 1965. His compelling story is told through the memories of people who had close personal and working relationships with him: prominent figures such as Maya Angelou, Ossie Davis and Alex Haley; Nation of Islam associates, including Wallace D. Muhammad, the son of Elijah Muhammad; and family members, including his wife, Betty Shabazz, and his oldest daughter, Attallah Shabazz. Included is extensive archival footage of Malcolm X, speaking in his own words at meetings and rallies, and in media interviews."

http://www.pbs.org/previews/americanexp_malcolmx/

On Feburary 3rd they will show a documentary about "The Quiltmakers of Gee's Bend"

"THE QUILTMAKERS OF GEE'S BEND tells the story of the critically acclaimed African-American quiltmakers from Gee's Bend, Alabama. The New York Times hailed their work as "some of the most miraculous works of modern art America has produced." The documentary explores the extraordinary lives, inspirations and history of these women, and also follows them on a poignant and sometimes comical bus journey to see their quilts exhibited at a major museum."

http://www.pbs.org/previews/quiltmakers_geesbend/

On Feb 07, 2005 PBS will air Chilsholm '72 Unbought and Unbossed"

"Announcing her candidacy for president on the evening news, Walter Cronkite quipped, "A new hat — rather a bonnet — was tossed into the presidential race today." As revealed in "CHISHOLM '72 — Unbought & Unbossed," a new feature documentary having its world broadcast premiere on public television's P.O.V. series, this first-ever run by a woman and person of color for presidential nomination was no laughing matter. Nor was it a polite exercise in symbolic electioneering. The New York Democratic congresswoman's bid engendered strong, and sometimes bigoted opposition, setting off currents that affect American politics and social perceptions to this day. Shirley Chisholm died at the age of 80 on January 1, 2005, at her home in Florida. "

http://www.pbs.org/pov/pov2005/chisholm/index.html

On Feb 01, 2005 (TOMORROW) PBS will be airing "February One: The Story of the Greensboro Four"

"February One: The Story of the Greensboro Four" offers an unusually intimate portrait of four familiar yet little-known men whose moral courage at age 17 not only changed public accommodation laws in North Carolina but served as a blueprint for non-violent protests throughout the 1960s. The film airs on PBS Tuesday, February 1, 2005.

http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/februaryone/index.html

America Beyond the Color Line with Henry Louis Gates Jr.February 6

In four programs, Gates travels to four different parts of America - the East Coast, the deep South, inner-city Chicago and Hollywood. He explores this rich and diverse landscape, social as well as geographic, and meets the people who are defining black America, from the most famous and influential - Colin Powell, Quincy Jones, Samuel L. Jackson, Fannie Mae's Franklin Raines, Jesse Jackson, Russell Simmons, Chris Tucker, Alicia Keys, Maya Angelou, Morgan Freeman - to those at the grassroots.
Coming face to face with the people and places that constitute the African-American experience today, Gates confronts the issues he spends his time writing and thinking about: race, identity, integration, culture, class, the legacy of history and what it means to be black and American today.

http://www.pbs.org/previews/colorline_gates/

– February 14 - 10:30PM
A film by Diane Bloom

"Viewers will be enthralled by this riveting film on the remarkable relationship of an outspoken black woman activist and an embittered klansman. The story of the altogether unexpected emergence of an alliance and a friendship between these two antagonists is moving, comic, and inspiring."
William E. Leuchtenburg, The William Rand Kenan Professor of History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

"About 25 years ago, I met the two heroes of this film -- CP Ellis and Ann Atwater. Their story is one of redemption. I think it's the most important documentary I've seen, and may be the most hopeful film in years." Studs Terkel

Long Walk to Freedom
February 18th 10:30PM

An intimate portrait of the 20th century great leaders, Nelson Mandela.

Check your local TV direcory for correct date and times of these shows.

These are the programs I know about, there may be more.

2 Comments:

At 5:40 PM, Blogger bombsoverbaghdad said...

PBS is a repository of black history like no other on television. "American Experience" is one of my favorite shows. Did you see the one on Martin Luther King called "Citizen King?" If not, it's worth purchasing. Wow.

Can't wait to see the rest of them this coming month.

 
At 3:36 PM, Blogger bombsoverbaghdad said...

can you guys blog roll me? www.thestateof.com

 

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